Science & Engineering Shit

WTF?

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Her name is “Ocean.” I think she’s pretty comfortable with a lot of that.

Also with heists.

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There’s pandering, and then there’s pandering.

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Elizabeth Holmes sentenced to 11 years to work on her stare and voice.

For ten milliseconds today the datetime palindrome will extend to the full 4-digit year:
2022-11-22 22:11:22.02

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Know what also doesn’t get enough attention? The Apollo 8 mission.
NASA and the country desperately needed a win in the space race at that time, if you will, and that mission delivered.

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Neil Armstrong was the best pilot in the world. Chuck Yeager was a piker comparatively. Armstrong was probably the only person who could have saved Gemini 8, the only one who could ever fly the “Flying Bedstead” training apparatus, and the only person who could have landed the Eagle on the moon given the problems. He was never boastful of his piloting skills and always considered himself an engineer first and foremost.

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This is a great related story from Neil Gaiman that’s worth revisiting: Neil Gaiman’s Journal: The Neil story (with additional footnote)
The gist:
*Some years ago, I was lucky enough invited to a gathering of great and good people: artists and scientists, writers and discoverers of things. And I felt that at any moment they would realise that I didn’t qualify to be there, among these people who had really done things.

On my second or third night there, I was standing at the back of the hall, while a musical entertainment happened, and I started talking to a very nice, polite, elderly gentleman about several things, including our shared first name. And then he pointed to the hall of people, and said words to the effect of, “I just look at all these people, and I think, what the heck am I doing here? They’ve made amazing things. I just went where I was sent.”

And I said, “Yes. But you were the first man on the moon. I think that counts for something.”*

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I have a framed picture of the Apollo 11 crew in my office. I’ve had it since 1969.

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I’d like to know how much extra RP-1 it took to get any of those astronauts’ gigantic brass balls in orbit.